Bennet Raises Concern Over Reports of Activity in North Korean Nuclear Program

Activity appears to contradict President Trump’s statement that North Korea is no longer a nuclear threat

Washington, D.C. – Colorado U.S. Senator Michael Bennet sent a letter to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats to request an assessment of North Korea’s nuclear program in light of reports of activity, contradicting President Trump’s statement that North Korea is no longer a nuclear threat.

“Any effort by North Korea to upgrade its nuclear infrastructure and ongoing production of weapons-grade of weapons-grade fissile material would seem to contradict the President’s assertions that North Korea no longer poses a threat to the United States,” Bennet wrote.

A copy of the letter is available below and HERE.

Dear Director Coats:

I write with concern regarding reports of continued activity of North Korea's nuclear program. Following his June 12 meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, President Trump stated in two separate tweets:

"...There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea...President Obama said that North Korea was our biggest and most dangerous problem. No longer - sleep well tonight!"

Yet, on June 26, a monitoring organization reported that improvements to infrastructure at North Korea's Yongbyon Nuclear Scientific Research Center, a facility that produces weapons-grade fissile material, continue at a rapid pace following the Singapore summit.

This report stands in contrast to the President's claim. It is widely known that North Korea has been seeking the ability to launch a nuclear attack against the United States. Any effort by North Korea to upgrade its nuclear infrastructure and ongoing production of weapons-grade fissile material would seem to contradict the President's assertions that North Korea no longer poses a threat to the United States.

In view of this information, I request a classified briefing regarding the current status of the North Korean nuclear program following the President's meeting with Kim Jong-un, including enrichment and fissile material production, weapons development, continued research, and development or improvement of any of its nuclear infrastructure. I would also appreciate a briefing on the Intelligence Community's assessment of the threat the program poses to the United States, our allies, and U.S. servicemembers serving in the Inda-Pacific region.

Thank you for your prompt attention and for your continued work on this critical issue. I am grateful for your service.